Who is the Good Samaritan?


After careful consideration, Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho when he fell into the hands of bandits. They stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. By chance, a priest was traveling along that road. When he saw the man, he went by on the other side. Similarly, a Levite came to that place. When he saw the man, he also went by on the other side. But as he was traveling along, a Samaritan came across the man. When the Samaritan saw him, he was moved with compassion. He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. The next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take good care of him. If you spend more than that, I’ll repay you when I come back.’ “Of these three men, who do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the bandits?” He said, “The one who showed mercy to him.” Jesus told him, “Go and do what he did.” (Luk 10:30-37)

Often we Christians like to think of our self as the Good Samaritan. We see people suffering and we are moved with compassion for them. We are the chosen ones who are showing God’s love to all people right?

Notice how the Samaritan went to the one who was suffering. The Church doesn’t seem to be going to those who are suffering. It cries at the pain and suffering, but it isn’t going to those who need us. For the most part, we are the priest and the Levite. No wonder people turn from the Church.

I don’t want to be one of them any more. I want to step out and go to those who are suffering.

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2 Comments

Filed under Bible, Christianity, Religion

2 responses to “Who is the Good Samaritan?

  1. a favorite quote of mine: “You can’t worship a homeless man on Sunday and ignore the homeless on Monday.”

    blessings on your mission and journey.

  2. “I don’t want to be one of them any more. I want to step out and go to those who are suffering.” (Xander)

    Love it! I think if the church could realize this as a true focus the Western World would be much better off and it’s churches would find strong meaning in that type of work.

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